T-ACE and predictors of self-reported alcohol use during pregnancy in a large, population-based urban cohort

  • Matthew Hicks University of Calgary
  • Suzanne C. Tough University of Calgary
  • David Johnston University of Calgary
  • Jodi Siever Alberta Health Services
  • Margaret Clarke University of Calgary
  • Reg Sauve University of Calgary
  • Rollin Brant University of Calgary
  • Andrew W. Lyon Saskatoon Health Region
Keywords: screening questionnaire, prenatal alcohol use, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, prenatal care

Abstract

Hicks, M., Tough, S., Johnston, D., Siever, J., Clarke, M., Sauve, R., Brant, R., & Lyon, A. (2014). T-ACE and predictors of self-reported alcohol use during pregnancy in a large, population-based urban cohort. The International Journal Of Alcohol And Drug Research, 3(1), 51-61. doi:10.7895/ijadr.v3i1.117

Aims: To determine 1) the relationship between T-ACE score and maternal self-reported alcohol use prior to and during pregnancy, and 2) the relationship between T-ACE score and maternal demographics, mental health and life circumstances.

Design: Prospective, population-based cohort study.

Setting: Three urban maternity clinics in Calgary, Canada.

Participants: 1,929 pregnant women attended by family physicians at low-risk maternity clinics.

Measures: Women completed three standardized questionnaires over the telephone in the first and third trimesters and eight weeks post-delivery, including the T-ACE and questions about drug and alcohol use, demographics, mental health and life circumstances.

Findings: 43.6% of subjects had a positive T-ACE score at intake (score 2 or greater). A positive T-ACE score was predictive of alcohol use throughout pregnancy, although most women reported no alcohol after the first trimester (93.1%). Multivariate analysis indicated that a positive T-ACE score was significantly associated with being less than 30 years of age; being Caucasian; smoking during pregnancy; having an income of less than $80,000 per annum; having a history of depression; having a history of alcohol use and binge drinking during a previous pregnancy; lower social support; and poor network orientation.

Conclusions: There was a positive association between the T-ACE score and maternal self-report of alcohol use, poor mental health and poor social support. Routine use of the T-ACE to assess for risk of an alcohol-exposed pregnancy may also help identify women with complex needs who could benefit from additional prenatal support.

Author Biographies

Matthew Hicks, University of Calgary
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
Suzanne C. Tough, University of Calgary

Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

 

David Johnston, University of Calgary
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
Jodi Siever, Alberta Health Services
Population and Public Health, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada
Margaret Clarke, University of Calgary
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
Reg Sauve, University of Calgary
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
Rollin Brant, University of Calgary
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
Andrew W. Lyon, Saskatoon Health Region
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Published
2014-03-19
How to Cite
Hicks, M., Tough, S. C., Johnston, D., Siever, J., Clarke, M., Sauve, R., Brant, R., & Lyon, A. W. (2014). T-ACE and predictors of self-reported alcohol use during pregnancy in a large, population-based urban cohort. The International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research, 3(1), 51-61. https://doi.org/10.7895/ijadr.v3i1.117
Section
Papers